Memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs. Book Excerpt from Memoirs of an Addicted Brain: A Neuroscientist Examines His Former Life on Drugs 2019-02-27

Memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs Rating: 6,6/10 715 reviews

Dr. Marc D. Lewis on Memoirs of an Addicted Brain

memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs

He stepped me through the most intricate feedback loops with patience and explanations I could understand. In Memoirs of an Addicted Brain, he applies his professional expertise to a study of his former self, using the story of his own journey through addiction to tell the universal story of addictions of every kind. The book culminates with an excruciating near career ending bottom. Halfway through this book, I would have given it 5 stars. The first is an extremely well-written, gripping narrative of the author's struggle with drug addiction. Extra serotonin makes the thinking process more relaxed—a nice change for depressives, who get a chance to wallow in relative normality.

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Memoirs of an Addicted Brain: A Neuroscientist Examines his Former Life on Drugs by Marc Lewis

memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs

Not through force, as with the devastating blows of alcohol and dextromethorphan, but through passivity. Memoirs of an Addicted Brain is as strange, immediate and artfully written as any Oliver Sacks case-study, with the added scintillation of having been composed by its subject. Lewis has certainly woven his experiences into an unusual and exciting book. Each of the neuromodulators fuels the brain operations in its own particular way. Serotonin cools this excitation, putting off the next axonal burst, making the receptive neuron less sensitive to the messages it receives from other neurons.

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Understanding Addiction

memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs

I found both parts of the book to be extremely compelling. Aside from being a pretty neat little primer on the neuroscience and psychopharmacology of drugs of abuse. Harsh smoke tears at the back of my throat, but its flavour is as comforting as anything I know. Ultimately, though, his journey took him where it takes most addicts: into a life of desperation, deception, and crime. Intense excitement, glee, power, triumph, and anticipation of the… oh yeah… shooting Demerol is just so nice. But all four of them share two properties. Once I understand something, I want to share it.

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Memoirs of an addicted brain : a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs (Book, 2011) [kongouji.com]

memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs

From opium pipe to orbitofrontal cortex, a smoothly entertaining interplay between lived experience and the particulars of brain activity. The science they create is often only an illusion, designed to deceive; and the scientists they destroy to protect that illusion are often our best. Dopamine fuels attraction, focus, approach, and especially wanting and doing. Dark, rich, and slightly bitter. Other Titles: Addicted brain Responsibility: Marc Lewis.

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Nonfiction Book Review: Memoirs of an Addicted Brain: A Neuroscientist Examines His Former Life on Drugs by Marc Lewis. Public Affairs, $26.99 (336p) ISBN 978

memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs

Access onsite and from home to registered Victorian users. Description: 327 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm Contents: The Tabor chronicles. Different brains have different quantities of receptors -- such as receptors for neurotransmitters like dopamine. But, as with all development, the conditions have to be right. Is it any wonder books like Sybil a memoir of a woman with circa 12 distinct personalities were so in vogue in the late 1970s. Night life in Rat Park -- Crime and punishment -- Healing -- Epilogue.

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Memoirs of an Addicted Brain: A Neuroscientist Examines his Former Life on Drugs by Marc Lewis

memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs

The evolutionary goals of adolescents are to become independent, to make new connections, and to find new territory, new social systems, and most of all new mates. Great, extremely flawed, but highly entertaining book. In the 1960s, Lewis was a teenager in boarding school, experimenting with cough syrup and alcohol to assuage his depression. Physical Description: 327 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references pages 309-312 and index. I disliked the main character, but I hated myself more for the lack of empathy.

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Book Excerpt from Memoirs of an Addicted Brain: A Neuroscientist Examines His Former Life on Drugs

memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs

Memoirs of an Addicted Brain is an uncomfortable, but still captivating exploration into a life most of us would fear for reasons of health, safety, and the sake of family and friends. In Memoirs of an Addicted Brain, he applies his professional expertise to a study of his former self, using the story of his own journey through addiction to tell the universal story of addictions of every kind. From opium pipe to orbitofrontal cortex, a smoothly entertaining interplay between lived experience and the particulars of brain activity. But why should this be so? At least with drug addiction and withdrawal there is an identifiable cause. A gripping, ultimately triumphant memoir that's also the most comprehensive and comprehensible study of the neuroscience of addiction written for the general public.

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Memoirs of an Addicted Brain : Marc Lewis : 9781610392334

memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs

Just a flicker, an image, a word echoing in memory, a rumbling in the gut, that first lurch of withdrawal symptoms, or the scent of hoisin sauce from a Chinese restaurant, eerily similar to the smell of opium bubbling. Are eating disorders a type of behavioral addiction? His narrative moves back and forth between the often dark, compellingly recounted story of his relationship with drugs and a revelatory analysis of what was going on in his brain. The whole book is a great story -- of one man's experiences, and of our common human vulnerability to addiction. But the final neuromodulator, serotonin, is more complicated in its action. Super awesome book with a great story of triumph. His narrative moves back and forth between the often dark, compellingly recounted story of his relationship with drugs and a revelatory analysis of what was going on in his brain. It's a fascinating and fact-filled glimpse into the world of needles and need.

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Memoirs of an addicted brain : a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs (Book, 2012) [kongouji.com]

memoirs of an addicted brain a neuroscientist examines his former life on drugs

But what a ploy-substance user experiences appears to be a close enough simulacrum. Replete with hella amphetamine binges, pharmacy break ins, jail time and even a stint on the front page of a Toronto news paper. To overcome delay discounting, addicts need to find a future self they can rely on. With my bias activated, I started to see his descriptions of drugs and the brain as rambling, a way to get rid of responsibility. The scientific part is detailed and thorough, but written so that a lay person can understand. I've had the good fortune to read an early copy of the manuscript and I find it brilliant both for Dr. The more we suffer, and the earlier in life we suffer, the more we are prone to become addicted.

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